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Very seldom do investors just fall into the lap of an early stage venture. A founder has to go out an hunt these opportunities; their weapon being the investor proposal.

First some sort of contact has to be made, and typically a phone call is set up to learn more. From there the investor will ask for more information. What they’re asking for is an investor proposal. This is somewhere in the neighborbood in length and content of an executive summary and a business plan. The shorter the better.

We’ve invested in over 100 different startups in the last three years, so we’ve seen our fair share of both amazing investor proposals, as well as embarrassingly bad ones. Here is a list of the biggest mistakes we see:

-The deal’s structure is either sloppy or absent

-The writing is piss/poor and alludes to any number of other unknown weaknesses the founder probably possesses

-The content doesn’t focus on the meat of the opportunity

-The hypotheses discussed are not realistic

-Too many rookie-red flags are shown

What Do We Mean When We Say “+ Design”?

It’s quite simple. Most investor proposals look like this:

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This is acceptable if you’re building a company in the 80’s, but isn’t acceptable in today’s world. Modern attention spans have forced entrepreneurs to re-think how they transfer information. A block of text isn’t good enough anymore. What we’re proposing is we first write and perfect your investor proposal in the boring format above. Then once you’re set on the content, we’ll make it look something like this:

“Word” Style – Typically Exported As A PDF

Example 1

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Example 2

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Example 3

“Slide” Style – Typically Exported As A PDF

Example 1

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Example 2

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Example 3

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These are the steps we’ll go through to create your investor proposal:

1. We’ll set up a phone call with one of our startup experts for a consultation. The goal of this phone call will be to (a) learn more about your company (b) determine the more likely ways that you’ll personally need an investor proposal (c) provide our opinions as to some strategy and structure and then (d) learn more about the who/what/when/where/how of the opportunity so we can…

2. We will then write a rough draft given the information that we have, and email you a copy of it.

3. You’ll make edits and provide feedback.

4. We’ll make changes accordingly and send you the final copy. If it requires further changes we’ll be happy to do so.

5. After the content has been figured out, we will provide you with a set of proposed “templates” when it comes to the design’s vision. These aren’t cheesy PowerPoint templates. It will be well beyond that. You’ll be able to choose from multiple formats (slideshow, Word, etc.).

6. We will then combine the two elements (the design and content) into one document. We’ll then send you a copy of the rough draft and wait for your approval.

7. From there you’ll have the beautiful and final product.

To order an investor proposal + design, the first step is to start a casual email conversation with someone from our team. So fill out the contact form below and we’ll get back to you ASAP.

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